CNNInternational interviews Nigeria'sPresident Obasanjo and Chido Nwangwu, Publisher ofUSAfricaonline.com,1st African-owned, U.S-based professional newspaper to be publishedon the Internet

Anambra's rigged 2003 elections:
Chris Uba's confession at WIC 2004 in Newark, USA

By RUDOLF OGOO OKONKWO
Special correspondent and columnist for CLASSmagazine,
USAfrica The Newspaper, Houston and USAfricaonline.com

USAfrica HIGHLIGHT: TheAnambra forum audience in Newark, New Jersey followed up withquestions after the younger Chief Chris Uba made his presentation andcase against Anambra's governor, the older physician, Dr. Chris Ngigewhom Uba says he played "godfather" to. There were questions aboutthe way forward and where all these had left the Anambra people. AsUba tried to answer one question, more were thrown at him. At onepoint Uba was visibly upset, "You cannot be raising your hand when Iam talking," he warned a forum member. Periodically voices wereraised and proceeding was charged. It was apparent that the audiencewas determined to challenge Uba on every count of his presentation.The challenge irritated Uba especially when a distinguished womanmember of the audience asked him "what about democracy?"

In a matter-of-fact manner, PDP's chieftain in Anambra ChrisUba stood up and astonished all that werepresent in Newark when he said, "We, the PDP, did not win theelection (of 2003). I have gone to church to confess. The electionhad no document. I called the result before 12 midnight. I gave INECthe money and asked them to call the result." The revelation causedan uproar as well as some applause in the hall. "The person we tookhis thing is here," Uba said, pointing at Peter Obi (the APGAcandidate) who was sitting among the audience, in the back row. Therewas a thunderous applause as people looked at Peter Obi and somebegan to call him 'governor.'

It was followed by a period of confusion. Voices were once againraised. Some screamed at Uba to continue with his confession. Otherscalled him disgusting and asked him to sit down. Another called Ubathe saving grace of Anambra state. Another man walked up to Uba whohad returned to his seat and pointed a finger at him saying, "Youdespicable man stole my mandate and our votes." Uba's aides,including the dreaded Chuma Nzeribe swung into action. Uba, to thesurprise of many, had the former chairman of PDP Anambra, Chief DanUlasi, among his delegation from Nigeria and Houston. When the forumturned more hectic, key members of the Uba delegation asked thecontroversial Uba to ignore those who demanded more answers. "Do notsay anything again!" they told him. I watched Uba as he consulted hisaides and immediately after he asked the video cameraman recordingthe proceeding to switch off his recorder. Uba tried to speak morebut his voice was drowned by the noise. In frustration, Uba said,"Let them make noise. I won't answer any other question." Uba's aideswere seen threatening those screaming at Uba, "Afterwards, you willcome back to Anambra state. Won't you? We shall see...." Fullreport below:


It was getting to 2pm on Sunday September 5, 2004. The church servicehad ended and I was talking to MO Ene outside the convention hall ofthe Newark Airport Sheraton Hotel when the Chairman of the World IgboCongress (WIC) came and urged that we come into one of the halls tolisten to a Jewish lawyer, Mr. Silverstone who was invited as a guestto the WIC 2004

Inside the hall, he talked about the place of Igbo in Nigeria andwhy the Igbo must accept the responsibility of rescuing Nigeria."They might not have your vision" Mr. Silverstone said, "but theyshare your dreams". It was a similar theme to those already expressedby Nigeria's former ruler, retired Gen. Muhammad Buhari on Thursday'sconvention forum who reminded the Igbo and other guests at the forumthat things worked in Nigeria when the Igbos were in charge of thingsand everything fell apart as soon as the Igbos were pushed off thescene after the 1967-1970 Nigeria-Biafra 'civil' war.

Many times, Silverstone's presentation was interrupted by loudnoise coming from the room next door. Several officials of WIC wentto the next room to pacify the rowdy delegates - all to no avail. Atthe end of Silverstone's presentation, I inquired; there and beholdwas Anambra Forum session 'number two.' It had about 84indivduals.

I walked into the raucous hall. Many delegates were standing bythe door charging and arguing on top of their voices. I secured aseat by the front row. There was a videotape on pause. The delegateswere in disagreement as to whether the video should continue to playor not. On the screen, with mouth wide open and words frozen in hismouth was Gov. Chris Ngige of Anambra state. "This is an insult tous," one delegate shouted from the back. "We have heard all thesebefore." Another screamed out louder than the one before. "If youdon't want to watch", yelled yet another from the left side of thehall, "get out and let those who want to watch do so."

I settled down and tried to observe the rowdy scenes. OyiboAchebe, the President of Enugu-Anambra indigenes in New Jersey, beganto calm the audience down. He had to scream over and above thedisorderly crowd in order to be heard. "I didn't know who Chris Ubawas until now," Achebe said pointing at Chris Uba who was sittingdirectly in front of me "but I think we should listen to hispresentation and afterwards those who have questions would ask him."Miraculously, the audience calmed down and the tape was once againturned on.

It was a documentary that chronicled the journey of Chris Uba andNgige. It covered the period before the campaign, during the campaignand afterwards when their relationship was dandy. In severalinstances, Ngige was seen singing the praise of Chris Uba andattributing to Uba the sole responsibility for his victory at theelection. The tape also showed Uba boasting about his confidence inNgige and in his ability to make Ngige governor.

After the tape had played, Chris Uba was called upon to explainthe essence of the tape. Oyibo Achebe premised the call by channelingthe discussion towards the finding of a lasting solution that wouldbring peace to Anambra people. The World Igbo Congress (WIC), hesaid, had charged the forum to come up with resolution that would beintegrated into the WIC's communiqué.

"Ngige is like someone afflicted with diarrhea. He has been goingaround the press talking," Uba said, "I want to explain to you peoplemy own side of the story." With that, Chris Uba stood up and began tonarrate the history of his relationship with Ngige. He bragged abouthow he literally picked Ngige up from obscurity and single handedlymade him a governor, irrespective "of the signs" that Ngige was, inhis assessment these days "not trustworthy." Ngige, he revealed, hadrocky relationships with everyone including his father and siblings.According to Uba, Ngige's own brother, Emeka Ngige, urged him "not tomake Chris Ngige governor.... When we got to Enugu, I pulled Ngigeinto a room, locked the door and asked him to tell the truth abouthis relationship with his father. I insisted that I should see hisfather."

Uba, whose brother Andy is a close personal aide of Nigeria'spresident Obasanjo went on to talk about how he visited Ngige'sfather and how the man reluctantly endorsed his son. PresidentObasanjo, Chris Uba alleged, also had doubts about Chris Ngige'sworthiness to be governor. He revealed how he took candidate Ngige toObasanjo who queried the candidate on Uba's report regarding Ngige'srelationship with his father and siblings. Uba claimed Obasanjo wasparticularly concerned that Ngige was not, allegedly, in a talkingterms with his father "over a land issue" and felt that suchindividual must not be entrusted with the governance of a state.

In light of these concerns, Uba said, he decided to sign severalagreements with Ngige before they proceeded to have him as the PDPcandidate - the same party Obasanjo belongs to. These agreements, hesaid, were aimed at ensuring that Ngige would not default from theexpectation of the caucus that put him in office. Copies of thesedocuments prepared and signed by Ngige were distributed. The Ubagroup had earlier bought over 17 pages in an African newspaper inwhich these documents were splashed.

Chris Uba proceeded to lay fresh accusations of how Ngige had beenmisusing Anambra state resources. He accused the governor ofmismanaging 150 million Naira monthly security vote and of claiming36 million Naira for meals every month. Uba mentioned instances wherehe would pay for hotel bill after a visit to Lagos and Abuja withNgige and their entourage and Ngige would get back to Awka and claimthe money from state coffers. On the marvelous road works Ngigeclaimed he had been doing in Anambra state, Uba said he would pay forthree people from Anambra U.S.A to come home and verify if any ofthose claims were true.

Uba seemed unapologetic and rather condescending to the incumbentgovernor of the state (who was not at the forum number two. Severaltimes, Uba stunned the audience with the words coming out of hismouth. His derision of the governor was perhaps unpalatable to thosewho have spent a great deal of their lives in western styleddemocracy.

Uba, without any qualm, used expressions like, "I forced Ngigeto…" "When I brought the commander in chief…" "Ngigestarted to cry and to beg me…" "I told Ngige that today istoday". "I called him and asked him to rush down…"

Responding to the general impression that he was running the stateas if it was his personal property, Uba told the forum "I do notcontrol Anambra state. I control the federal government." The easewith which he threw around the president's name in his tales wasshocking and revealing. His unrestricted access to the president wasapparent. It was obvious that Uba either had no sense or did not careabout how unappealing his deportment was to the audience. He madespirited efforts to convince the forum that he made investment inNgige's political career and deserved a pay back.

"Ninety-five percent of the things Ngige signed," Uba said, "wasfor the interest of Anambra state." As if the forum would beimpressed that Uba only wanted five percent. "If I want to get backmy money," Uba bragged, "I will recommend a contractor."

The Anambra forum audience in Newark, New Jersey followed up withquestions after the younger Chief Chris Uba made his presentation andcase against Anambra's governor, the older physician, Dr. Chris Ngigewhom Uba says he played "godfather" to. There were questions aboutthe way forward and where all these had left the Anambra people. AsUba tried to answer one question, more were thrown at him. At onepoint Uba was visibly upset, "You cannot be raising your hand when Iam talking," he warned a forum member. Periodically voices wereraised and proceeding was charged. It was apparent that the audiencewas determined to challenge Uba on every count of his presentation.The challenge irritated Uba especially when a member of the audienceasked him "what about democracy?"

In a matter-of-fact manner, Uba stood up and astonished all thatwere present when he said, "We, the PDP, did not win the election (of2003). I have gone to church to confess. The election had nodocument. I called the result before 12 midnight. I gave INEC themoney and asked them to call the result." The revelation caused anuproar as well as some applause in the hall. "The person we took histhing is here," Uba said, pointing at Peter Obi (the APGA candidate)who was sitting among the audience, in the back row. There was athunderous applause as people looked at Peter Obi and some began tocall him 'governor.'

It was followed by a period of confusion. Voices were once againraised. Some screamed at Uba to continue with his confession. Otherscalled him disgusting and asked him to sit down. Another called Ubathe saving grace of Anambra state. Another man walked up to Uba whohad returned to his seat and pointed a finger at him saying, "Youdespicable man stole my mandate and our votes." Uba's aides,including the dreaded Chuma Nzeribe swung into action. Uba, to thesurprise of many, had the former chairman of PDP Anambra, Chief DanUlasi, among his delegation from Nigeria and Houston. When the forumturned more hectic, key members of the Uba delegation asked thecontroversial Uba to ignore those who demanded more answers. "Do notsay anything again!" they told him. I watched Uba as he consulted hisaides and immediately after he asked the video cameraman recordingthe proceeding to switch off his recorder. Uba tried to speak morebut his voice was drowned by the noise. In frustration, Uba said,"Let them make noise. I won't answer any other question." Uba's aideswere seen threatening those screaming at Uba, "Afterwards, you willcome back to Anambra state. Won't you? We shall see...."

An armed security man was brought in and he spoke to the forummembers to calm down or be kicked out of the hall. When calmreturned, Uba declined to comment further. Peter Obi was called upand he spoke with discretion and wisdom.

In a measured voice, Obi told the forum "If I say what ishappening in Anambra state, you will be mad." He said, ironically, hewould trust "this person here, Ochiagha" (pointing to Chris Uba)before he would trust the man he (Obi) contested with for theposition of Anambra governor, Dr. Chris Ngige. Obi told the story ofhow Chris Ngige confessed in his presence and in front of Bishopsthat he (Ngige) did not win the 2003 governorship election. He onceagain repeated what had become his mantra when he said, "When thepremise of an argument is wrong, the conclusion is also wrong." Mr.Obi charged Anambra people abroad to help "save our State" sayingthat only those abroad could rescue Anambra. "If you reason like thepeople at home, we'll all be finished. You're our hope." He wentfurther to warn, "The society we abuse today will tomorrow takerevenge on our children."

Thereafter, the session ended as rancorous as it began. As ChrisUba and his entourage drove into town, I followed him for aninteresting evening....


Stay tuned to USAfricaonline.com and subscribe to theOctober 2004 special edition of CLASS magazine Vol. 2.5 whereinsightful and authoritative reports by professional journalists andaward-winning writers from our community's multimedia networks ofUSAfrica and CLASS will capture WIC 2004 in New Jersey. Plus, CLASSmagazine will offer the most comprehensive and compellingphotographic features of the convention. Book your copies and callonly 713-270-5500 and 832-45-CHIDO (24436) if you were at theconvention and will like to be featured.E-mail: Class@Classmagazine.tv


Are weIgbosor "Ibos"?
By CHIDO NWANGWU


The "Ibo" misspelling of the south eastern Nigerian Igbo ethnicnation of almost 32 million people reflect, essentially, apost-colonial hangover of British and Euro-Caucasoid colonialmiseducation,misrepresentations, and (mis)pronounciation preference. It is/wasjust easier for the White man/woman to say 'Ibo' rather than'Igbo.' We must remember the late psychiatrist, pan-Africanscholar and activist Franz Fanon's mytho-poetic and insightful wordsin his 1952 book, Black Skin White Masks, that "A man who hasa language [consequently] possesses the world expressed andimplied by that language." Should Igbos and other Africannationalities, incrementally and foolishly give up the core of theircommunal and national identity on the discredited altars ofEuro-Caucasoid racist supremacy and colonial predations? I have twomodest answers: first is No; and second is No.

Regarding the use of the word "Ibo" as opposed to "Igbo" in somemedia outlets, commentaries and recent announcements by some of ourfolks, may I make a few observations:

First, let's state the most important element of this languageadvisory: the erroneous, incorrect usage and blatant dislocation ofthe Igbo identity and name is the preference for the colonialspelling and reference, lazily spelled as "Ibo." Second, the "Ibo"misspelling reflects, essentially, a post-colonial hangover ofBritish and Euro-Caucasoid colonial miseducation, misrepresentations,incorrect spellings and (mis)pronounciation preference. It is/wasjust easier for the White man/woman to say 'Ibo' rather than'Igbo.'

Such language and cultural impositions which are fancifully andfarcically adopted by the colonized natives and the dispirited arestill evident across the African continent, south and central Asiaand parts of Latin America where colonialist predation was not onlyeconomic but a crude decapitation of the languages, mores, cultureand identities of the ethnic nations they invaded and colonized.

Third, and more important, the linguistic history, autography andanthropological identities of the almost 35 million citizens of theenterprising, vibrant, resourceful, unduly intra-antagonistic,capitalistic, religious, and republicanist communities and people whoform the Igbo nation show, credibly, that our language and ethnicnation should always be identified and spelt as Igbo.

Note the fact that there's an Igbo alphabet identified as "gb" asdistinguishable from "g" and "b"; same for "gw" as distinguishablefrom "g" and "w". For instance in Nwangwu, which many inattentivenon-Igbo, put forth a wrong, hurried misspelling: Nwangu.

Again, they remove the Igbo alphabet "gw". For the nation, Igbo,the 'gb' is the key.

Many Igbos and other people have mixed up the Igboidentity/name/language/people with this colonial misrepresentation as"Ibo(s)."

We must not dilute the correct spelling(s) of the Igbo nation andpeople; and in fact ours, individually. Otherwise, we should allgladly celebrate the backwater hatefulness encapsulated in themisspelling of Obigbo and Umumasi as (R)umuigbo and (R)umumasi. It'sthat important and basic, too.

We should not give up any Igbo alphabet and spellings, in thisregard, therefore. It is different from abbreviating a long surnameor first name.

Immediately after the birth on December 20, 1998, of the Houstonoctuplets, I believe one of the better things I've contributed toglobal Igbo interest was factually and materially causing the world'snumber 1 news agency AP through some of its news staff, especiallyMark Barbineck (bless him!) to change the reference to Igbos as"Ibos" as a minimum standard for me to do the interviews with AP(same standard was held up for any other media corporation during mypro-bono (free) international multimedia projection services and newsinterviews I offered to benefit the octuplets and their parents. Ithas become, thankfully, the AP standards as well as those of almost30,000 newspapers who take the AP and Reuters' news feed to refer tous as Igbo(s). If your local newspaper does the "Ibo" stuff, kindlywrite them and demand a correction.

I never heard/read the Azikiwes, Okparas, Ojukwus, Achebes,Nwangwus, Nzeogwus, Obis, Emeagwalis, Nwafors, Ogbalus, or Obicheresrefer to us as "Ibo(s)".

Hopefully, this modest language advisory will set the affirmative,conclusive identification on the issue of whether we are "Ibos" orIgbos. It is, for me, Igbos, sui generis, as a people, an identityand as a language.

We must remember the late psychiatrist, pan-African scholar andactivist Franz Fanon's mytho-poetic and insightful words in his 1952book, Black Skin White Masks, that "A man who has a language[consequently] possesses the world expressed and implied bythat language."

Should Igbos and other African nationalities, incrementally andfoolishly give up the core of their communal and national identity onthe discredited altars of Euro-Caucasoid racist supremacy andcolonial predations? My modest answer is No.

Before some demagogic and ill-informed "native" comes to thedefense of the Euro-Caucasian impositions, let's quickly note thatthis is not a debate about language accretion and/or addingconceptual properties and descriptive symbols to enrich our language,or any language, for that matter. For example, I argue we should addthe words Computer, Internet, etc to the Igbo language, and regardingsame in its contextualized Igbo meaning or word(s).

 I'll state, without fear of contradiction that no language,today, is clinically restricted and strictly reflective of itsnational borders. None! Not even the Talibans in their tunnel visionof the world, and cultural phillistinism.

May God continue to enrich the Igbo nation as we protect, projectand defend our heritage and identity into the new millennium. I'llclose with the wise words of the same, late African warrior FranzFanon who wrote, "Each generation must discover its mission, fulfillit, or betray it." On whose and which side are you?


ChidoNwangwu, recipient of the Journalism Excellence award (1997), isFounder and Publisher of first African-owned U.S.-based professionalnewspaper to be published on the internet, USAfricaonline.com.He appears as an analyst on CNN International and CNN's Inside Africaand publishes Houston-based CLASSmagazine, USAfrica TheNewspaper, and TheBlack Business Journal.Nwangwu served as an adviser to the former Mayor of Houston (LeeBrown) on international business (Africa)

The commentary, above, is copyrighted byUSAfricaonline.com; therefore, archiving on any other web site ornewspaper is unauthorized except with a written approval byUSAfricaonline.comFounder (December 11, 2001)

Igbo traditional life, culture and literature
By Prof. Emmanuel Obiechina

Monday, June 17, 2002
Re: USAfricaonline.com: Are we Igbos or "Ibos"? By Chido Nwangwu

In a book co-edited by Michael J.C.Echeruo and myself in 1971, I devoted considerable space dealing with this question of the correct naming of
Ndi-Igbo, the ethnic nationality, the language, and the identity, in a fairly lengthy "Introduction." I commend this discussion to your audience.
The book is titled Igbo Traditional Life, Culture and Literature and was published by Conch Magazine Press in New Paltz, New York.

It is now out of print, after a number of reprints, but it is available in major libraries in the United States. An interesting aspect of this question is that it has been deliberately and intelligently dealt with by James Africanus Beale Horton, a Sierra Leonean intellectual whose parents were Igbo, in the nineteenth century.

From all available evidence, it is obvious that from deepest antiquity, the people have always known themselves and their language as "Igbo."
Prof. Obiechina, a leading scholar on English, literature and African sociology, teaches at Harvard University. He was a deputy vice chancellor of the University of Nigeria, Nsukka.



Igbo or Ibos essay offers excellent insight
By Ndiribe A. A. Ndiribe

Tuesday, December 11, 2001
Re: USAfricaonline.com: Are we Igbos or "Ibos"? By Chido Nwangwu

Chido, (you've written) an excellent insight. Please continue thegood work of educating our kith and kin who swallow foreign rubbish,hook, line and sink(er)!
I once told one racist that I care less what he decides to answersince he cares less how my own name is pronounced. I cannot struggleto pronounce McPherson with all the tonal accents when the Caucasiandoes not care a heck how Chukwudi is pronounced.
Ndiribe is a Professor of International Relations at Seton HallUniversity in New Jersey.



Only walking museums still refer to the Igboas "Ibo"
By Dr. Chidiebere Nwaubani

Wednesday June 12, 2002
Re: USAfricaonline.com: Are we Igbos or "Ibos"?

I salute Chido Nwangwu for a well-articulated position. It isbaffling that in the year 2002, some segments of the Western worldstill need to be educated that we are Igbo not "Ibo." These guys mustbe tone-deaf. The earliest Europeans who wandered into our lands wereincapable of pronouncing "Igbo" (and didn't bother to learn how topronounce it).

They found it more convenient to refer to our forebears as"Heebo," "Eboe," and "Ebo" -- as evidenced in the accounts of thoseof them who visited the Lower Niger in the 19th century (e.g. M.Laird, R. A. K. Oldfield, W. Allen, T. R. H. Thomson, Richard andJohn Lander, William Baike). By the turn of the 20th century, theEuropeans had settled on "Ibo" -- and for quite a while some of ourWesternized kinsmen and women went along with them in thisregard.

The "consensus," over the past 20 years, has been to abandon thecolonialist corruption of our collective identity (Ibo) andre-instate the original and true usage (Igbo). Today, only walkingmuseums of the European muddling of African languages still refer tothe Igbo as "Ibo." Incidentally, this is an elaboration of lines Ihad written in December 2000 onwww.jendajournal.com/jenda/vol1.1/responses
Nwaubani teaches at the Department of History, University ofColorado at Boulder.


This issue is food for thought....
By C . Ukachukwu <c_ukachukwu@yahoo.com>
Tuesday, December 11, 2001
Re: USAfricaonline.com: Are we Igbos or "Ibos"? By Chido Nwangwu

This happens to be a pet peeve of mine: Ndigbo who addressthemselves as "Ibos". Simply because it was good enough for thewhiteman doesn't mean it ought to be good enough for nwa afo Igbo.This goes to the core of one's identity. We are Ndi Igbo.

Contrary to popular belief, we shouldn't view mangling our ownidentity as cute. I've called people's phones at work (and sometimeseven at home!) to hear their imitation of Americans imitating theFrench (or whoever) trying to pronounce their own Igbo names. "Hello,you have reached Nu-wa-nko's desk,..."(he means Nwankwo!) How aboutthis: "Sorry The Yoo-Bah family cannot take your call right now..."(Yoo-Bah is for Uba). I can go on. If one voluntarily validates thewrong identity erroneously hung on one by an unwitting associatewhere does one eventually stand to get it right? This food forthought by Mr. Nwangwu is worth a sober digestion.



Thursday June 13, 2002
Re: USAfricaonline.com: Are we Igbos or "Ibos"? By ChidoNwangwu

Thanks for the correction.... Thanks for yourgreat work.
By Ngozi Nweze-Eleweanya

DIPLOMACY Walter Carrington: African-American diplomat who put principles above self for Nigeria (USAfrica's founder Chido Nwangwu with Ambassador Carrington at the U.S. embassy, Nigeria)


What has Africa to do with September 11 terror? By Chido Nwangwu
Why Bush should focus on dangers facing Nigeria's return to democracy and Obasanjo's slipperyslide. By Chido Nwangwu
How Obasanjo's self-succession charade at his Ota Farm has turned Nigeria to an 'Animal Farm.' By USAfricaonline.com contributor Prof. Mobolaji Aluko
Obasanjo's late wake to the Sharia crises, Court's decision and Nigeria's democracy. By Ken Okorie
Obasanjo's own challenge is to imbibe "democratic spirit and practice," By Prof. Ibiyinka Solarin
Is Obasanjo really up to Nigeria's challenge and crises? By USAfrica The Newspaper editorial board member, attorney Ken Okorie. This commentary appears courtesy of our related web site, NigeriaCentral.com
Obasanjo's late wake to the Sharia crises, Court's decision and Nigeria's democracy. By Ken Okorie

Sharia-related killings and carnage in Kaduna reenact deadly prologue to Nigeria-Biafra war of 1967. By Chido Nwangwu.
Jonas Savimbi, UNITA are "terrorists" in Africans' eyes despite Washington's "freedom fighter" toga for him. By SHANA WILLS

Nelson Mandela, Tribute to the world's political superstar and Lion of Africa  
Winnie Madikizela-Mandela's burden mounts with murder charges, trials

TRIBUTE
A KING FOR ALL TIMES: Why Martin Luther King's legacy and vision are relevant into 21st century.





DEMOCRACY'S WARRIOR
Out of Africa. The cock that crows in the morning belongs to one household but his voice is the property of the neighborhood. -- Chinua Achebe, Anthills of the Savannah. An editor carries on his crusade against public corruption and press censorship in his native Nigeria and other African countries. By John Suval.
ARINZE: Will he be the FIRST BLACK AFRICAN POPE? By Chido Nwangwu
HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY
How far, how deep will Nigeria's human rights commission go?
AFRICA AND THE U.S. ELECTIONS
Beyond U.S. electoral shenanigans, rewards and dynamics of a democratic republic hold lessons for African politics.
Rtd. Gen. Babangida trip as emissary for Nigeria's Obasanjo to Sudan raises curiosity, questions about what next in power play?
110 minutes with Hakeem Olajuwon
Nigerian stabbed to death in his bathroom in Houston.
Cheryl Mills' first class defense of Clinton and her detractors' game 
It's wrong to stereotype Nigerians as Drug Dealers

Private initiative, free market forces, and more democratization are Keys to prosperity in Africa


Apple announces Titanium, "killer apps" and other ground-breaking products for 2001. iTunes makes a record 500,000 downloads.
Steve Jobs extends
digital magic

Johnnie Cochran will soon learn that defending Abacha's loot is not as simple as his O.J Simpson's case. By Chido Nwangwu

USAfrica The Newspaper voted the "Best Community Newspaper" in the 4th largest city in the U.S., Houston. It is in the Best of Houston 2001 special as chosen by the editors and readers of the Houston Press, reflecting their poll and annual rankings.

APPRECIATION
A young father writes his One year old son: "If only my heart had a voice...."


Why Chinua Achebe, the Eagle on the Iroko, is Africa's writer of the century. By Chido Nwangwu

Since 1958, Achebe's "Things Fall Apart" set a standard of artistic excellence, and more. By Douglas Killam
DEMOCRACY DEBATE
CNN International debate on Nigeria's democracy livecast on CNN. It involved Nigeria's Information Minister Prof. Jerry Gana, Prof. Salih Booker and USAfricaonline.com Publisher Chido Nwangwu. Transcripts are available on the CNN International site.

NEWS
5 students from Nigeria at Abilene Christian University killed in March 31, 2002 one-car accident.18 year-old Kolawole Oluwagbemiga Sami was identified as the driver of the Isuzu which had 2 other men and 3 women. One of those female passengers in the 1994 Isuzu Rodeo SUV had an identification card stating her as Iyadunni Oluwaseun Bakare. She is also 18 years old. USAfricaonline.com special report by Chido Nwangwu
USAfrica The Newspaper voted the "Best Community Newspaper" in the 4th largest city in the U.S., Houston. It is in the Best of Houston 2001 special as chosen by the editors and readers of the Houston Press, reflecting their poll and annual rankings.

Osama bin-Laden's goons threaten Nigeria and Africa's stability. By Chido Nwangwu
Tragedy of Ige's murder is its déjà vu for the Yoruba southwest and rest of Nigeria. By Ken Okorie
What has Africa to do with September 11 terror? By Chido Nwangwu
Should Africa debates begin and end at The New York Times and The Washington Post? No
NEWS INSIGHT
CNN, Obasanjo and Nigeria's struggles with democracy.
Why Obasanjo's government should respect
CNN and Freedom of the press in Nigeria.
Jonas Savimbi, UNITA are "terrorists" in Africans' eyes despite Washington's "freedom fighter" toga for him. By SHANA WILLS


Lifestyle
Sex, Women and (Hu)Woman Rights. By Chika Unigwe

Africa suffers the scourge of the virus. This life and pain of Kgomotso Mahlangu, a five-month-old AIDS patient (above) in a hospital in the Kalafong township near Pretoria, South Africa, on October 26, 1999, brings a certain, frightening reality to the sweeping and devastating destruction of human beings who form the core of any definition of a country's future, its national security, actual and potential economic development and internal markets.
22 million Africans HIV-infected, ill with AIDS while African leaders ignore disaster-in-waiting

Africans reported dead in terrorist attack at WTC
September 11 terror and the ghost of things to come....
Will religious conflicts be the time-bomb for Nigeria's latest transition to civilian rule?
Bola Ige's murder another danger signal for Nigeria's nascent democracy.

In a special report a few hours after the history-making nomination, USAfricaonline.com Founder and Publisher Chido Nwangwu places Powell within the trajectory of history and into his unfolding clout and relevance in an essay titled 'Why Colin Powell brings gravitas, credibility and star power to Bush presidency.'

CONTINENTAL AGENDA
Bush's position on Africa is "ill-advised." The position stated by Republican presidential aspirant and Governor of Texas, George Bush where he said that "Africa will not be an area of priority" in his presidency has been questioned by USAfricaonline.com Publisher Chido Nwangwu. He added that Bush's "pre-election position was neither validated by the economic exchanges nor geo-strategic interests of our two continents."

These views were stated during an interview CNN's anchor Bernard Shaw and senior analyst Jeff Greenfield had with Mr. Nwangwu on Saturday November 18, 2000 during a special edition of 'Inside Politics 2000.'
Nwangwu, adviser to the Mayor of Houston (the 4th largest city in the U.S., and immigrant home to thousands of Africans) argued further that "the issues of the heritage interests of 35 million African-Americans in Africa, the volume and value of oil business between between the U.S and Nigeria and the horrendous AIDS crisis in Africa do not lend any basis for Governor Bush's ill-advised position which removes Africa from fair consideration" were he to be elected president.
By Al Johnson