CNNInternational interview with Nigeria'sPresident Obasanjo and USAfricaonline.com Publisher Chido Nwangwu onDemocracyand Security Issues

Aristide cruelly turned his back on his peopleand promises

With violence and chaos spreading in Haiti, the world communitycannot afford to just stand by and do nothing. With the police hidingin their barracks, armed thugs patrolling the street and the electedpresident appealing for international protection, Haiti is on theverge of another major humanitarian and political crisis.It's understandable that the Bush administration has "no enthusiasm,"as Secretary of State Colin Powell put it, to intervene militarily.However, there is an urgent need for an international peacekeepingeffort. If ever there was a situation calling out for United Nationspeacekeepers, Haiti is it.

The two-week-old uprising has killed at least 60 people. The U.S.government Thursday urged Americans to leave, and the Peace Corpsbegan withdrawing its staff. Washington also dispatched a militaryteam to assess security at the U.S. Embassy. As the nation that stoodbehind the president, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the United States has aspecial obligation to help.

Since American military forces restored Aristide to power in1994, after his ouster in a coup, Aristide has cruelly turned hisback on his people and promises. He has not alleviated the humanmisery in Haiti or reached out to his political opponents. Armedvigilantes roaming the streets terrorize in his name. Aristide hasbecome a polarizing force and a discredited figure internationally.The rebels, however, are not any better. Many leaders are onetimedeath squad commanders, who have no political legitimacy or idea howto govern.

The United Nations, working with Caribbean leaders and France andCanada, should dispatch a peacekeeping force as soon as possible totry to end the bloodshed. Beyond the need to protect innocent livesand extend a humanitarian hand, the United Nations should underscorethat change in Haiti must come through the democratic process.Aristide should be held to the commitments he made to his people. Heneeds to disarm and disband the vigilante groups, disassociatehimself from their operations and bring political opponents into thegoverning process. The world community has an interest in protectingAristide, but it stems from his standing as a democratically electedpresident and because the alternative is even worse. Far fromendorsing his presidency, international intervention would be a slapat the character of man who sold himself to the world as a championof democratic principles and then betrayed those very principles.

Washington has a major role to play in defusing this crisis - anda big stake in the outcome. This country, after all, restoredAristide to power, and it will become the destination of any massexodus of Haitian refugees. On Friday, diplomats from the UnitedStates, Europe and the Caribbean were preparing to present Aristideand opposition groups a plan for political reform and a return to therule of law. It's largely the same plan that was presented to thewarring parties weeks ago. Secretary of State Powell said the plandoes not call for Aristide's resignation but added that the UnitedStates would not object if he decided to step down before his termends as part of a negotiated political solution.

Even if the violence can be quelled in the coming days, ahumanitarian crisis is already upon one of the poorest countries inthe world. The world community should quickly unite behind an effortthat offers humanitarian aid and protects both human rights andHaiti's sovereignty.
Culled from an editorial on February 21, 2004 by the editors ofSt. Petersburg Times in Florida.


Again, Haitianblood on America's hands.Exclusive USAfricaonline.com commentaryby Rufus G.W. Sanders, Ph.D

Osama bin-Laden's goons threaten Nigeria and Africa's stability. By Chido Nwangwu, USAfricaonline.com Publisher.


NEWS INVESTIGATION: The Marc Rich Oil Deals in Nigeria
OIL in NIGERIA: Liquid Gold or Petro-Dollars Curse?


Should Africa debates begin and end at The New York Times and The Washington Post? No
Why Bush should focus on
dangers facing Nigeria's return to democracy and Obasanjo's slipperyslide.
How Obasanjo's self-succession charade at his Ota Farm has turned Nigeria to an 'Animal Farm.' By USAfricaonline.com contributor Prof. Mobolaji Aluko
Obasanjo's late wake to the Sharia crises, Court's decision and Nigeria's democracy. By Ken Okorie
Obasanjo's own challenge is to imbibe "democratic spirit and practice," By Prof. Ibiyinka Solarin
Is Obasanjo really up to Nigeria's challenge and crises? By USAfrica The Newspaper editorial board member, attorney Ken Okorie. This commentary appears courtesy of our related web site, NigeriaCentral.com
Obasanjo's late wake to the Sharia crises, Court's decision and Nigeria's democracy. By Ken Okorie

Sharia-related killings and carnage in Kaduna reenact deadly prologue to Nigeria-Biafra war of 1967. By Chido Nwangwu.
Jonas Savimbi, UNITA are "terrorists" in Africans' eyes despite Washington's "freedom fighter" toga for him. By SHANA WILLS

Nelson Mandela, Tribute to the world's political superstar and Lion of Africa  
Winnie Madikizela-Mandela's burden mounts with murder charges, trials

DIPLOMACY Walter Carrington: African-American diplomat who put principles above self for Nigeria (USAfrica's founder Chido Nwangwu with Ambassador Carrington at the U.S. embassy, Nigeria)
DEMOCRACY'S WARRIOR
Out of Africa. The cock that crows in the morning belongs to one household but his voice is the property of the neighborhood. -- Chinua Achebe, Anthills of the Savannah. An editor carries on his crusade against public corruption and press censorship in his native Nigeria and other African countries. By John Suval.
ARINZE: Will he be the FIRST BLACK AFRICAN POPE? By Chido Nwangwu
HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY
How far, how deep will Nigeria's human rights commission go?
Rtd. Gen. Babangida trip as emissary for Nigeria's Obasanjo to Sudan raises curiosity, questions about what next in power play?
110 minutes with Hakeem Olajuwon
Nigerian stabbed to death in his bathroom in Houston.
Cheryl Mills' first class defense of Clinton and her detractors' game 
It's wrong to stereotype Nigerians as Drug Dealers

Private initiative, free market forces, and more democratization are Keys to prosperity in Africa


Apple announces Titanium, "killer apps" and other ground-breaking products for 2001. iTunes makes a record 500,000 downloads.
Steve Jobs extends
digital magic

Johnnie Cochran will soon learn that defending Abacha's loot is not as simple as his O.J Simpson's case. By Chido Nwangwu

USAfrica The Newspaper voted the "Best Community Newspaper" in the 4th largest city in the U.S., Houston. It is in the Best of Houston 2001 special as chosen by the editors and readers of the Houston Press, reflecting their poll and annual rankings.

APPRECIATION
A young father writes his One year old son: "If only my heart had a voice...."



TRIBUTE
A KING FOR ALL TIMES: Why Martin Luther King's legacy and vision are relevant into 21st century.



Why Chinua Achebe, the Eagle on the Iroko, is Africa's writer of the century. By Chido Nwangwu


Since 1958, Achebe's "Things Fall Apart" set a standard of artistic excellence, and more. By Douglas Killam
DEMOCRACY DEBATE
CNN International debate on Nigeria's democracy livecast on CNN. It involved Nigeria's Information Minister Prof. Jerry Gana, Prof. Salih Booker and USAfricaonline.com Publisher Chido Nwangwu. Transcripts are available on the CNN International site.

USAfrica The Newspaper voted the "Best Community Newspaper" in the 4th largest city in the U.S., Houston. It is in the Best of Houston 2001 special as chosen by the editors and readers of the Houston Press, reflecting their poll and annual rankings.

Tragedy of Ige's murder is its déjà vu for the Yoruba southwest and rest of Nigeria. By Ken Okorie
What has Africa to do with September 11 terror? By Chido Nwangwu
Should Africa debates begin and end at The New York Times and The Washington Post? No
NEWS INSIGHT
CNN, Obasanjo and Nigeria's struggles with democracy.
Why Obasanjo's government should respect
CNN and Freedom of the press in Nigeria.
Jonas Savimbi, UNITA are "terrorists" in Africans' eyes despite Washington's "freedom fighter" toga for him. By SHANA WILLS


Lifestyle
Sex, Women and (Hu)Woman Rights. By Chika Unigwe

Africa suffers the scourge of the virus. This life and pain of Kgomotso Mahlangu, a five-month-old AIDS patient (above) in a hospital in the Kalafong township near Pretoria, South Africa, on October 26, 1999, brings a certain, frightening reality to the sweeping and devastating destruction of human beings who form the core of any definition of a country's future, its national security, actual and potential economic development and internal markets.
22 million Africans HIV-infected, ill with AIDS while African leaders ignore disaster-in-waiting

What has Africa to do with September 11 terror? By Chido Nwangwu
Africans reported dead in terrorist attack at WTC
September 11 terror and the ghost of things to come....
Will religious conflicts be the time-bomb for Nigeria's latest transition to civilian rule?
Bola Ige's murder another danger signal for Nigeria's nascent democracy.

In a special report a few hours after the history-making nomination, USAfricaonline.com Founder and Publisher Chido Nwangwu places Powell within the trajectory of history and into his unfolding clout and relevance in an essay titled 'Why Colin Powell brings gravitas, credibility and star power to Bush presidency.'

AFRICA AND THE U.S. ELECTIONS
Beyond U.S. electoral shenanigans, rewards and dynamics of a democratic republic hold lessons for African politics.
CONTINENTAL AGENDA
Bush's position on Africa is "ill-advised." The position stated by Republican presidential aspirant and Governor of Texas, George Bush where he said that "Africa will not be an area of priority" in his presidency has been questioned by USAfricaonline.com Publisher Chido Nwangwu. He added that Bush's "pre-election position was neither validated by the economic exchanges nor geo-strategic interests of our two continents."

These views were stated during an interview CNN's anchor Bernard Shaw and senior analyst Jeff Greenfield had with Mr. Nwangwu on Saturday November 18, 2000 during a special edition of 'Inside Politics 2000.'
Nwangwu, adviser to the Mayor of Houston (the 4th largest city in the U.S., and immigrant home to thousands of Africans) argued further that "the issues of the heritage interests of 35 million African-Americans in Africa, the volume and value of oil business between between the U.S and Nigeria and the horrendous AIDS crisis in Africa do not lend any basis for Governor Bush's ill-advised position which removes Africa from fair consideration" were he to be elected president.
By Al Johnson